Bacon’s Prose Style(Long)

Francis Bacon is generally recognized as the first great writer of English philosophy although he had no great respect for the English language. It is a known fact that Bacon is influenced by Montaigne. Emerson is the one modern writer with whom Bacon may be fairly compared, for their method is much the same. They endeavour to reach the reader’s mind by a series of aphoristic attacks. In rhetorical power, musical cadence, quaint turns of speech, he is equalled by many of his contemporaries, excelled by a few, but for a clear, terse, easy writing, he has no peer save Ben Jonson, and even to-day his Essays are models of succinct, lucid prose. Material success and services to humanity were his objects in life. These aims were sometimes in conflict; though he did his best to blend them, and when the tussle came, personal considerations won the day.

The genesis of his Essays is quite interesting. He jotted down in talking, any brilliant or suggestive thing he heard, or any illuminating thought that struck him. These he put together into a book—constantly augmenting his stock. In them we find a storehouse of worldly wisdom.

Bacon’s primary object is the discovery of truth, and this he managed with a conciseness that is amazing. For sheer density of material combined with felicity of expression and an ability to choose the right word, we need look no further than Bacon.

Francis Bacon is generally recognized as the first great writer of English philosophy. His writings are considered to be the storehouse of wisdom. His primary aim is the discovery of truth. In apt words he conveys deep ideas.

The hallmarks of his writings are: (a) use of short and sharp statements (b) use of logical sequence (c) contraction and expansion of ideas (d) images from day to day life (e) use of Latin and Greek expressions.

Use of Short and sharp statements

One of the hallmarks of Bacon’s essays is the presentation of ideas using short and sharp sentences. One can find numerous examples in his essays. In “Of Studies” he uses sentences like “ Reading maketh a full man…”, “Histories make men wise…” Crafty men contemn studies…”


Use of logical sequence

Bacon’s systematic thought gives way to the sequencing of ideas in the logical order. “Of Love”, begins with the comparison of love in real life and in stage. Then he presents the adverse effect of love and finally categorises the good and evil kind of love. He follows the same order in all his essays.

Contraction and Expansion of Ideas
First he gives the idea in condensed form, “Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability”(Of Studies).Then he expands, “Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornaments is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgement and disposition of business…”.

Images from day to day life

Bacon draws analogy from day to day life in the form of images. He uses horticultural and culinary images to name a few. For example, “Some books are to be tasted…”, “for natural abilities are natural plants…” (Of Studies).

Use of Latin and Greek expressions

“ Abeunt studia in mores…” in “Of Studies”.
“Optimum elige…” in “Of Parents and Children“.
“ Satis magnum…” in “ Of Love”.
“ Vetulam Suam…” in “Of Marriage and Single Life”.

To sum up, brevity is the soul of Bacon’s wit.

Bacon’s Prose Style(Not Long)

For inspiration Montaigne, in method akin to Emerson, Bacon’s Essays are more illuminating aimed at imparting worldly wisdom, but not without fault as it was the jottings of the follies of his day. To be precise, follies—not in full, but in parts.

Bacon’s primary object is the discovery of truth, and this he managed with a conciseness that is amazing. For sheer density of material combined with felicity of expression and an ability to choose the right word, we need look no further than Bacon.


The hallmarks of his writings are: (a) use of short and sharp statements (b) use of logical sequence (c) contraction and expansion of ideas (d) images from day to day life (e) use of Latin and Greek expressions.


Use of Short and sharp statements

One of the hallmarks of Bacon’s essays is the presentation of ideas using short and sharp sentences. One can find numerous examples in his essays. In “Of Studies” he uses sentences like “ Reading maketh a full man…”, “Histories make men wise…” Crafty men contemn studies…”.


Use of logical sequence

Bacon’s systematic thought gives way to the sequencing of ideas in the logical order. “Of Love”, begins with the comparison of love in real life and in stage. Then he presents the adverse effect of love and finally categorises the good and evil kind of love. He follows the same order in all his essays.

Contraction and Expansion of Ideas
First he gives the idea in condensed form, “Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability”(Of Studies).Then he expands, “Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornaments is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgement and disposition of business…”.



Images from day to day life

Bacon draws analogy from day to day life in the form of images. He uses horticultural and culinary images to name a few. For example, “Some books are to be tasted…”, “for natural abilities are natural plants…” (Of Studies).

Use of Latin and Greek expressions

“ Abeunt studia in mores…” in “Of Studies”.
“Optimum elige…” in “Of Parents and Children“.
“ Satis magnum…” in “ Of Love”.
“ Vetulam Suam…” in “Of Marriage and Single Life”.

To sum up, brevity is the soul of Bacon’s wit.





Bacon’s Prose Style(Short)

Francis Bacon is generally recognized as the first great writer of English philosophy. His writings are considered to be the storehouse of wisdom. His primary aim is the discovery of truth. In apt words he conveys deep ideas.

The hallmarks of his writings are: (a) use of short and sharp statements (b) use of logical sequence (c) contraction and expansion of ideas (d) images from day to day life (e) use of Latin and Greek expressions.

Use of Short and sharp statements

One of the hallmarks of Bacon’s essays is the presentation of ideas using short and sharp sentences. One can find numerous examples in his essays. In “Of Studies” he uses sentences like “ Reading maketh a full man…”, “Histories make men wise…” Crafty men contemn studies…”


Use of logical sequence

Bacon’s systematic thought gives way to the sequencing of ideas in the logical order. “Of Love”, begins with the comparison of love in real life and in stage. Then he presents the adverse effect of love and finally categorises the good and evil kind of love. He follows the same order in all his essays.

Contraction and Expansion of Ideas
First he gives the idea in condensed form, “Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability”(Of Studies).Then he expands, “Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornaments is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgement and disposition of business…”.

Images from day to day life

Bacon draws analogy from day to day life in the form of images. He uses horticultural and culinary images to name a few. For example, “Some books are to be tasted…”, “for natural abilities are natural plants…” (Of Studies).

Use of Latin and Greek expressions

“ Abeunt studia in mores…” in “Of Studies”.
“Optimum elige…” in “Of Parents and Children“.
“ Satis magnum…” in “ Of Love”.
“ Vetulam Suam…” in “Of Marriage and Single Life”.

To sum up, brevity is the soul of Bacon’s wit.